PRINCIPLES OF MODERN GRINDING TECHNOLOGY
Hardbound, 300 pages, publication date: MAY-2009
ISBN-13: 978-0-8155-2018-4
ABRASIVE ENGINEERING SOCIETY

COMPLETE TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction  1

1.1 The Role of Grinding in Manufacture   
  Origins of Grinding   
  What Is Grinding? 
  A Strategic Process  I
  Quality and Speed  2
  Machining Hard Materials  2
  Accuracy  3
  Surface Texture  3
  Surface Quality  3
  Speed of Production  3
  Cost  4
  The Value Added Chain  4
  Reducing the Number of Operations  4
1.2 Basic Grinding Processes  5
1.3 Specification of Elements  7
  Basic Elements  7
  System Elements  8
  Element Characteristics  8
  Grinding Machine  9
  Grinding Fluid  9
  Atmosphere  9
1.4 The Book and Its Contents  10

2 Basic Material Removal  15


  2.1 The Removal Process  15
  2.2  Depth of Material Removed  17
    The Stiffness Factor K  19
    Size Error  20
    Barrelling  21
  2.3 Equivalent Chip Thickness  21
  2.4 Material Removal Rate  22
  2.5 Specific Grinding Energy  23
  2.6 Forces and Power  25
    Grinding Power  25
    Grinding Force Ratio  26
    Typical Forces  26
    Wet Grinding  29
    Effect of Abrasive Type  29
  2.7 Maimizing Removal Rate  30
    Process Limits  30
    Limit Charts  31
    References  33

3 Grinding Wheel Developments  35


  3.1 Introduction  35
  3.2 Abrasives  35
    Superabrasives  37
     Diamond  37
  Cubic Boron Nitride  38
  Conventional Abrasives  38
  Silicon Carbide  38
  Aluminium Oxide  39
  Sintered Alumina  40
  3.3  Wheel Bonds  41
    Organic Bonds  41
    Vitrified Bonds  42
    Metal Bonds  43
  3.4  Grinding Wheels  43
  3.5  Wheel Specification  44
    Standard Marking System Conventional 45
   System for Superabrasive Wheels    45
    Grain Size  45
    Grade  47
    Structure Number  48
    Porosity  48
    Concentration  49
  3.6  Wheel Design and Application  49
    Safety  49
    Wheel Mounting  49
    Balancing  50
  3.7  High Speed Wheels  51
    Unbalanced Stresses  51
    Balanced Stresses  51
    Practical Considerations for Design of
        High Speed Wheels  54
      A Solid Wheel  54
      Central Reinforcement  54
      A Tapered Wheel  55
      Bonding to a Metal Hub  55
      Bonded Segments  55
      Metal Bond  55
      Dressable Metal Bond  56
3.8   Wheel Elasticity and Vibrations  56
    References  58

4 Grinding Wheel Dressing  59


  4.1  Introduction  59
  4.2  Stationary Dressing Tools  59
   Multi Point Diamond Tools  60
   Form Dressing Tools  60
   Single Point Diamond Tools  60
   The Dressing Process  60
   Overlap Ratio  61
   Dressing Tool Sharpness  61
   Coarse and Fine Dressing  62
  4.3 Rotary Dressing Tools  63
   Dressing Roll Speed Ratio  63
   Dressing Vibrations  65
   Grinding Wheel Dressing Speed  66
  4.4 Grinding Performance  66
   Dressing Traverse Rate  66
   Coarse, Medium, and Fine Dressing  67
   Dressing Tool Wear  68
  4.5 Touch Dressing for CBN Wheels  69
   Purpose of Touch Dressing  69
   Grinding Performance  69
   Touch dressing Equipment  71
   Acoustic Emission (AE)& Contact Sensing  72
   Wheel Loading  73
  4.6 Continuous Dressing  74
  4.7 Electrolytic In process Dressing (ELID)  75
   References  78

5 Wheel Contact Effects  79


  5.1 The Abrasive Surface  79
   Grain Size and Grain Sharpness  79
   Shape Conformity  79
   Abrasive Structure  79
   Grain Spacing and Distribution  80
   Wheel Flexibility  82
  5.2 Grain Wear  82
   Rubbing Wear  82
   Bond Fracture  83
   Grain Micro Fracture  83
   Grain Macro Fracture  83
   Wheel Loading  83
   Preferred Wheel Wear  84
   Wear Measurement  84
   G  Ratio  84
  Wear Flats  85
   Re sharpening  86
  5.3 Wheel Workpiece Conformity  87
   Equivalent Diameter  87
  5.4 Contact Length  89
   Geometric Contact Length  89
   Kinematic Contact Length  91
   Deflected Contact Length  91
   Total Contact Length  92
   Contact Length Ratio  93
   References  93

6 High Speed Grinding  95


  6.1 Introduction  95
  6.2 Trends in High Speed Grinding  95
   Quality, Productivity, and& Cost 95
   Better Removal Rate Better Accuracy& 95
  6.3 High Speed Domains  97
  6.4 High Efficiency Grinding  97
   Early Development  97
   Machine Requirements  98
   Emulsion or Neat Oil  98
   Speed Ratio  99
  6.5 Creep Feed Grinding  99
  6.6 High Efficiency Deep Grinding (HEDG)  100
   HEDG Development  100
   Drill Flute Grinding  101
   Crankshaft Grinding  101
   Chip Thickness  101
   Specific Energy  102
   Viper Grinding  102
   Temperature Analysis  102
  6.7 High Work Speed Grinding  103
   Cylindrical Grinding  103
   Speed Stroke Grinding  103
   References  103

7 Avoiding Thermal Damage  105


  7.1 Introduction  105
   Types of Thermal Damage  105
   Damage Avoidance  105
  7.2  The Iron Carbon Diagram  106
    Explaining Thermal Damage  106
  7.3  Bum and Temper Damage  106
    Severe Oxidising Bum  106
    Temper Damage  107
  7.4  Re hardening Damage  108
    Surface Cracks  109
  7.5  Residual Stresses  109
  7.6  Grind Hardening
  7.7  Process Monitoring
    Barkhausen Noise Sensors
    Monitoring Power  112
    Process Control  112
    References  112

8 Application of Fluids  113


  8.1  Introduction  113
    Types of Grinding Fluid  113
    Functions of a Grinding Fluid  113
    Contact Area Cooling  113
    Reduction of Wheel Wear  113
    Bulk Cooling  114
    Swarf Flushing 115
    Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL)   115
    Safe Use and Disposal of Fluids  115
    Alternative Lubrication Possibilities  116
    Total Life Cycle Costs  116
    Oil versus Water Based Fluids  116
    Fluid Properties  116
    Dry Grinding  117
  8.2  Water Based Fluids  117
    Re circulating Systems  117
    Fluid Treatment  117
    Fluid Compositions  118
  8.3  Neat Oils  118
    Mineral Oils  120
    Synthetic Oils  120
  8.4  MQL and Gas Jet Cooling  120
    MQL with Oil  120
    Mist Cooling  121
  Cryogenic Cooling  121
  Ice Air Jet Blasting  121
8.5 Pumping System  121
  Basic Elements  122
  Separation  122
  Heat Exchanger  122
  Wheel Absorption of Fluid  123
  Supply Flow Rate and Pressure  123
8.6 Fluid Delivery  123
  Hydrodynamic Effects and Size Control  123
  Roughing and Finishing Requirements  124
  Air Barrier  124
  Highly Porous Wheels  125
  Sealing the Wheel  125
  Pore Feeding  125
  Use of an Air Scraper  125
  Nozzle Position and Fluid Speed  126
  Nozzle Arrangements  126
  Auxiliary Nozzles  127
  Positioning the Jet  127
  Coherence  128
  Webster Nozzle  128
  Coherent Length  129
  Nozzle Comparisons  129
  Shoe Nozzle  130
  Nip  130
8.7 Nozzle Design Calculations  131
  Turbulence  131
  Round Orifice Nozzle  131
  Round Pipe Nozzle Transitional Flow  133
  Rectangular Nozzle  133
8.8 Nozzle Flow Rate Requirements  134
  Useful Flow Rate  135
  Nozzle Flow Rate  135
  Achievable Useful Flow Rate  135
  Measured Useful Flow Rate  138
  Bulk Cooling  140
8.9 Power Required to Accelerate the Fluid  141
  Spindle Power  141
  Total Power  141
  References  143

9 Cost Reduction  145


  9.1 Introduction  145
   Output, Quality, and Cost  145
   Total Life Cycle Costs  145
   Cost Variables  145
   Overhead Costs  146
   Wheel, Machine, and Labour Costs  146
  9.2 Analysis of Cost per Part  147
   Cost Elements  147
   Total Cycle Time  147
   Grinding Cycle Time  147
   Dressing Cycle Time  148
   Dressing Frequency  149
   Number of Parts per Wheel  149
   Wheel Cost per Part  150
   Labour Cost/Part  150
   Machine Cost/Part  151
   Total Variable Cost/Part  152
  9.3 Cost Reduction Trials  152
   Basic Trials  153
   Direct Effects  154
   Selection of Best Conditions  155
   Confirmation Trials  156
9.4 Cost Comparisons for AISI 52 100  156
  Grinding Wheels  157
  Best Conditions  157
    Conventional Speed Alumina and SG Wheels  158
    Conventional Speed CBN Wheel  158
    High Speed B91 CBN Wheel  158
    Cost Comparison  158
    Re dress Life  159
9.5 Cost Comparisons for Inconel 718  159
  Grinding Wheels  159
  Best Conditions  160
    Conventional Speed A1203Wheel  160
    Conventional Speed Vitrified B 151
      CBN Wheel  160
    High Speed B 151 CBN Wheel  160
    Re dress Life and Cost Comparison  160
  References  161

10 Grinding Machine Developments  163


  10.1  Machine Requirements  163
    Stiffness  163
    Accuracy  163
    Thermal Deflections  163
    Wear  164
  10.2  Grinding Machine Elements  164
  10.3 Machine Stiffness and Compliances  164
    Definition of Static Stiffness  164
    Damping  167
    C Frame and U Frame  Structures  167
    Slide Ways and Bearing Deflections  167
    Compliances and the Force Loop  168
    Improvement of Grinding Performance  170
    Improvement during Spark Out Time  170
  10.4  Design Principles for Machine Layout  171
  10.5  Spindle Bearings and Wheel Heads  174
    Spindle Elements  174
    Spindle Roundness  174
    Spindle Types  174
  10.6  Plain Hydrodynamic Spindle Bearings  174
  10.7  Rolling Bearings  175
  10.8  Hydrostatic and Hybrid Bearings  176
    Advantages  176
    Basic Design  177
    Restrictors  178
    Maximum Load  178
    Flow rate  179
    Average Oil Film Stiffness  179
    Concentric Stiffness  180
    Pumping Power  180
    Friction Power  180
    Power Ratio  181
    Temperature Rise  182
  10.9  Air Bearing Spindles  182
    Features  182
    Basic Design  183
    Restrictors  183
    Air Journal Bearing Load  184
10.10 Machine Base  184
10.11  Column Deflections and Thermal Effects  185
  Bending Deflections  185
  Thermal Deflections  186
10.12  Joints, Slide Ways, and Feed Drives  187
  Feed Drive Elements  187
  Positioning Accuracy  187
  Movement Directions  188
  Joint Deflections  190
  Slide Ways  191
  Plain Bearing Slide Ways  191
  Rolling Element Slide Ways  192
  Hydrostatic Slide Ways  192
  Air Bearing Slide Ways  193
  Feed Drive Mechanisms  193
  Feed Drive Controls  194
10.13  Trends in Grinding Machine Development  195
  High Wheel Speed Grinders  195
  Deep Forrn Grinders  195
  Speed Stroke Grinders  196
  Multi Part Grinders  196
  Multi Tool Grinders  197
  Flexible Multi Part Grinding  197
10.14  Ultra Precision Grinders  198
  Applications  198
  Basic Principles  198
  Ultra Precision Centreless Grinder (Rowe 1979;
    Spraggett 1979; Rowe et al. 1987)  199
  Ultra Precision Surface and Centreless Grinders
    (Yoshioka et al. 1985)  199
  Ultra Precision Grinding Using Ultra Fine
    Abrasive Pellets (Ikeno et al. 1990)  202
  Ultra Precision Grinding with ELID
    (Ohmori and Nakagawa 1990)  203
  Mass Production Double Sided Face Grinder
    (KMT Precision Grinding AB, 1998)  203
  Magnetic Fluid Grinding of Ceramic Balls
    (Childs et al. 1994)  204
  Ultra Precision Grinding Machine:
    "Nano Centre" (McKeown ;et al. 1990)    204
  Magnetic Memory Disk Combination Grinder
    (Cranfield Precision Engineering 1993)    205
Ultrasonic Assisted Grinding (Uhlmann 1998;
  Uhlmann et al. 2000)  205
Precision Big OptiX (BoXTm)
  Grinding and Measuring Machine
  (Shore et al. 2005)  207
References  208

11 Process Control  211


  11.1      Process Variability  211
    Variations due to Wheel Wear  211
    Limits and Tolerances  212
    Size Variations due to Dresser Wear  213
    Process Stabilisation  214
    In Process Gauging  214
  11.2      Classes of Machine Control  216
    Manual Control  217
    Switching Control  217
    Computer Numerical Control (CNC)  218
    Intelligent Control  218
  11.3      Intelligent Control of Grinding  220
    Adaptive Strategy  221
    Adaptive Feed Rate Control  221
    Adaptive Dwell Control  222
    Role of Time Constant  223
    Time Constant during In Feed  224
    Time Constant during Dwell  225
    Control of Plunge Grinding  226
  11.4      Knowledge Based Intelligent Control Systems  227
   General Framework for Intelligent Control 228
   Systems and Intelligent Databases  228
    The CNC  229
    Monitoring and Adaptive Control Optimisation
        (ACO) Modules  229
      Temperature Sensing  230
      Gap Elimination  230
      Touch Dressing  230
      Power Sensing  231
      Operator Inputs  231
      Thermal Damage  231
    References  231

12 Vibration Problem Solving  233


  12.1  Introduction  233
    Impulsive Vibrations  233
    Forced Vibrations  234
    Self Excited Vibrations  234
  12.2  Dynamic Relationships for Grinding  236
    Block Diagram  236
    Basic Equations  237
    Basic Solutions  239
    Free Vibration  239
    Forced Vibration  239
    Transfer Functions  239
  12.3  Contact Length Filtering  240
  12.4  Machine Stiffness Characteristics  242
    Excitation Tests  242
    Light Running Tests  244
  12.5  Stiffness,Damping,Resonance  245
  12.6  Chatter Conditions  247
    Introduction  247
    Graphical Stability Determination  248
    Using Measured Frequency Responses    249
    Reducing Overlap in Traverse Grinding    250
    Reducing Wheel Contact Stiffness    251
    Adding Flexibility to System    252
    Varying Work Speed or Wheel Speed    253
    Adding Vibration Damping  254
    References  254
13 Centerless Grinding  257
  13.1  Introduction  257
    Application  257
    Research by the Author  257
    Research by Other Authors  258
  13.2  Centreless Grinding Processes  258
    External Centreless Grinding  258
    Internal Centreless Grinding  260
    External Shoe Grinding  260
    Internal Shoe Grinding  261
  13.3  Set Up Geometry/Removal Param 261
    Contact Geometry  261
    Work Plate Angle  261
    Work Height  262
  Tangent Angle  262
  Experimental Rounding Investigation  263
  Removal Parameters for Plunge Grinding  264
13.4  Work Feed  264
  Plunge Feed  264
  Through Feed  265
  Tilt Angle  266
13.5  Wheel Dressing  266
  Grinding Wheel Dressing  266
  Control Wheel Dressing  267
    Position A  267
    Position B  268
  Control Wheel Run Out  268
13.6  Machine Design, Roundness Errors, & Productivity
269
  Machine Design  269
  Work Speed and In Feed Rate  270
13.7  Convenient Waviness  270
  Work Plate Corrective Action  271
  Control Wheel Corrective Action  272
13.8 Simulation of the Rounding Action  272
  Basic Simulation Equation  273
  Interference and Loss of& Contact& Constraints  274
  Simulation Results  276
13.9  The Shape Formation System  277
13.10  Stability of the Rounding Process  278
  Stability of a Closed Loop System  278
  Geometric Instability  279
  Geometric Stability Parameter "A"  280
  Integer Wave Stability  282
  Regions of Instability  282
13.11  Effect of Deflections  284
  Static Deflections  284
  Dynamic Deflections  285
13.12  Avoiding Dynamic Problems  286

14 Material Removal byGrains  291


14.2  Equivalent Chip Thickness  292
  Empirical Relationships for Grinding Data  293
  Limitations of heq  293
14.3  Cutting Edge Contacts  294
  Random Cutting Action  294
  Representation by Poisson Distribution   294
  Cutting Edge Density  296
  Effect of Wear  296
  Cutting Edge Shape  297
14.4  Cutting Edge Contact Times  298
14.5   The "Uncut Chip"  300
  Effects of the Uncut Chip Dimensions  300
  Use of Kinematic Models  300
  Basic Kinematic Model  300
  Basic Chip Shape Models  301
14.6  Chip Length  302
14.7  Chip Volume Based on Removal Rate  302
14.8  Chip Cross Section Area  303
14.9  Chip Thickness  304
  General Expression for Chip Thickness   304
  Chip Width to Chip Thickness Ratio Triangular Chip   305
  Triangular Chip Thickness  305
  Spherical/Round Chip Thickness  306
  Comparison of Mean Chip Thickness Values   307
  Maximum Chip Thickness  307
  Chip Thickness Conclusions  307
  Grain Density Variations  308
14.10 Surface Roughness  309
14.11 Appendix: Maximum Chip Thickness Derivation from Geometry  312
References   314

15 Real Contact  315


  15.1  Real and Apparent Contact Area  315
  15.2  Real Contact Length  316
  15.3  Smooth Wheel Analysis  320
  15.4  Rough Wheel Analysis  321
  15.5  Calibration of the Roughness Factor R,  323
    Comparison with Verkerk  323
    Defining Contact Length Empirically  324
    Qi Measurements  325
Contact Length Ratio  326
References  327

16 Specific Energy  329


  16.1    Introduction  329
  16.2    The Size Effect  329
    Measured Specific Energy  329
    Relationship to heq  329
    Physical Reasons  330
  16.3    Threshold Force Effect  331
  16.4    Surface Area Effects  331
    Surface Area Created  331
    Chip Volume and Surface Area  331
    Specific Energy and Surface Area  331
    Depth of Cut and Surface Area  332
    Grain Density and Surface Area  332
    Work Speed and Surface Area  332
    Conclusion Chip Thickness and
      Specific Energy  333
  16.5  Grain Shape and Sharpness Effects  333
    Quantifying Sharpness  333
    Indentation Model  334
    Wear and Dressing Effects on Grain Shape  335
  16.6  Rubbing, Ploughing, and Cutting  335
    3 Domains of Abrasive Contact  335
      Rubbing  335
      Ploughing  335
      Cutting  335
      Sub Threshold Condition  335
    3 Energy Components  336
      Sliding or Rubbing Energy  336
      Chip Formation Energy  337
      Minimum Energy Asymptote  337
      Ploughing Energy  338
    References  339

17 Mechanics of Abrasion  341


  17.1    Introduction  341
  17.2  Primary, Secondary, Tertiary Shear Zones  341
    Primary Shear  341
    Shear Strain Rates  342
  Transition from Compressive to Tensile  342
  Redundant Energy  342
  Blunt Cutting Action  342
  Minimum Energy Principle  343
17.3.   Rubbing Contact  343
  Basic Adhesion  343
  Interface Friction  344
  Junction Growth  345
  Three Dimensional Stresses with
    Junction Growth  345
17.4  Ploughing Contact  347
  Basic Rabinowicz Model  347
  Modified Rabinowicz Model    348
  Cone and Sphere Model  349
17.5   Indentation Analysis  350
  Slip Line Field Analysis  350
  Pare Indentation  350
  Friction Angle  350
17.6   Indentation with Sliding  351
17.7   Basic Challen and Oxley Models  351
  Wave Rubbing  352
  Wave Wear  354
  Chip Formation  354
17.8  Oblique Cutting  356
17.9 Wear  357
  Tribo Chemical Conditions  357
  Adhesive Wear  358
  Wear Life Cycle  359
  Real Contact Length  359
  Application of Archard's Law  360
  Determination of K  360
  Yield Mode  360
  Fatigue  360
  Abrasive Wear  361
  Oxidative Wear  361
  Corrosion  361
  Thermal Wear  362
  Chemical Wear  362
  Grinding Fluid  362
  References  362

18 Temperatures in Grinding  365


  18.1    Introduction  365
  18.2    Background  365
    Development of Temperature Analysis  365
    A Moving Heat Source  365
    Four Heat Flows  365
    Workpiece Conduction  366
    Fluid Convection  366
    Chip Energy  367
    Heat Partitioning  367
    Work Partition Ratio R,  367
    Work Wheel Fraction  367
    Heat to the Wheel  367
      Wheel Contact Analysis  368
      Grain Contact Analysis  368
    Real Contact Length  368
    Total Grinding Energy  368
    Energy Monitoring  369
    Damage Temperatures  369
    Grain Thermal Properties  369
    Workpiece Thermal Properties  369
  18.3    Heat Input and Heat Dissipation  370
    Heat Input  370
    Heat Dissipation  371
    Flash Heating  371
    Grain Heating  371
    Background Heating  372
  18.4    Workpiece Surface Temperatures  372
    Workpiece Temperature Rise  372
    Heat Partitioning  373
    Heat Flux Definition  374
    Chip Flux  374
    Work Wheel Fraction  375
    Fluid Convection  376
    Predictions of Fluid Convection Coefficient h;  377
    Peclet Number and Diffusivity  378
    Contact Angle  379
    C Factors for Maximum Temperatures  379
    Contact Surface Temperatures and Finished
      Surface Temperatures  380
18.5    Workpiece Sub Surface Temperatures  381
  Accurate Two Dimensional Method  381
  Approximate One Dimensional Method    382
  One Dimensional Solution Technique  383
  Linearised Curve Fits and Averaging  383
18.6  Temperature Measurement  384
  Grain Temperatures  384
  Background Temperature Methods  384
  Surface Temperature Thermocouples  384
  Dry Grinding  385
  Wet Grinding  386
18.7  Measured Temperatures  387
  Effect of Abrasives  387
  Effect of Depth of Cut  388
  Effect of Grain Sharpness  388
  Effect of Grinding Fluid  389
  Shallow Cut or Deep Cut?  390
  High Removal Rate Grinding  390
  Wheel Wear  392
  Work Material  392
18.8    Appendix A: General Solution for Grinding
    Temperatures  392
18.9    Appendix B: Derivation of Work Wheel Fraction  395
  Analysis of Conduction into the Workpiece     395
  Analysis of Conduction into the Grain h9    396
  References  397
Index        399
return rev 8/2/2010